Do Not Copy

Do Not Copy

Thursday, September 22, 2016

9-22-16 A Little ID Practice

Thursday, September 22nd
...it began with some morning whales...far from shore, spread out and foraging...
...so here's some ID 'work' for you...many people ask how you can tell who is who from such a distance (sometimes) and sometimes with lousy lighting...so here's a bit of fun for you...click to enlarge the image - it will still be distant...


...it was a sunny day and a good day to sit outside at the lighthouse, instead of being inside as I have lately...

...lots of gull action...skimming up the bait fish...these gulls missed more than caught...they fit the description of the California gull...

...J and K pod whales were coming down from the Fraser River...would they make it before dark?...





...it was just about dark when the last of them came past...and once again only they know where they will be tomorrow...most likely back out west to look for more salmon...
...the Albion test fishery (you can just google that) showed that the numbers for the Chinook had dropped (and they never were good this season) and the Chum salmon numbers were starting to increase...and the whales eat Chum salmon...
...so here are the answers to the three images at the beginning of the post...


...find the little things that stick out in your mind as you learn who is who.

...after all they aren't just a bunch of whales in the water, they are beings, who belong to a family and a community...they play together (called socializing), they forage together and share their food, and did you know they only speak the language of their community?  Yes. And they don't have a 'foreign exchange program'...so they don't associate outside of their community which is J, K, and L Pods.
Next time you see these magnificent beings think about how they might be interacting, whether it be goofing around, or resting (i.e. - sleeping), or echolocating (tap, tap, tap) to find food...what might they be up to?
They are fascinating beings and deserve our respect.  They are not here to entertain us, they are here for the salmon.  There is so much humans could learn from them - cooperation, caring, helping, and more...

If you have had only one encounter with them, remember it always.
If you see them all the time treat each time as if it is the first time you've ever seen them.
No ho-hum allowed :)


 
 


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